A review of the book homeward bound by elaine tyler may

For one, according to May, "for all its affirmation of the emancipation of women, Hollywood fell short of pointing the way toward a restructured family that would incorporate independent women. May notes the wide range of sources from popular culture movies, mass circulation periodicals and newspapersthe writings of professionals in numerous fields, as well as the papers and statements of those who influenced and formulated public policies.

The KLS was a survey of the interaction between the ideals and the behavior of about six-hundred men and women who formed families during the s and s. Aiming to ascertain why, unlike both their parents and children, "postwar Americans turned to marriage and parenthood with such enthusiasm and commitment," May discovers that "cold war ideology and the domestic revival [were] two sides of the same coin: The family was the arena in which that adaptation was expected to occur; the home was the environment in which people could feel good about themselves.

It allowed them to pursue, in the midst of a tense and precarious world situation, the quest for a sexually-fulfilling, consumer-oriented personal life that was free from hardship.

Introduced here is an interesting idea of female independence as a disease, as narrated through Carol Sears who, one can assume, struggled with subordinating domesticity. One final conclusion from Chapter Three is the iconography used to decorate fighter planes during the war; the association of sexy women and aggressive power was only acceptable to unleash on enemies, but unleashing it within the United States would be disastrous, May says.

Using the Kitchen Debate between Nixon and Khrushchev to underscore the connections between domesticity and containment, May explains how the home became the site at which such dangerous and destabilizing social forces as atomic power and female sexuality would be tamed.

The cold war consensus and the pervasive atmosphere of anticommunism made personal experimentation, as well as political resistance, risky endeavors with dim prospects for significant positive results These trends were exacerbated by the unleashing of the atomic bomb.

Oxford University Press, As May puts it, "women entered war production, but they did not give up on reproduction Continuing to prove its remarkable contribution as a source, the KLS brings forth a new discovery regarding psychology. Also pertained to containing use of an atomic bomb and domestic communism.

For these white middle-class couples, viable alternatives to domestic containment were out of reach. American Families in the Cold War Era would be of even greater interest now, fourteen years after the attacks and eight years after the publishing of the [revised] book.

Nor does she view this era as a return to Victorian ethos; her examination of the sexual mores of the day reveals that there was a containment of sexual expression to within the marriage contract and nuclear family rather than a repression of sexuality.

Only surveying a group of middle class white Americans, the results are skewed. But, as the years went by, they also found themselves bound to the home. The University of North Carolina Press, She is the co-editor of Here, There and Everywhere: Perhaps the most famous of these sexually destructive women was Marilyn Monroe though others include: Memoir, History, and Writing a Life May discusses her sources in the introduction, all of which contribute significantly to her research.

Homeward Bound

Nixon promoted the ranch-style home as a means to defeat communism; it epitomized the secure lifestyle postwar Americans desired. With depression and war behind them, and with political and economic institutions fostering the upward mobility of men, the domesticity of women, and suburban home ownership, they were homeward bound.

Here, May explores this connection and, by bringing public policy and political ideology to bear on the study of private life, places the family within the larger political culture rather than outside of it. American Families in the Cold War Era provides a walk down memory lane.

She asserts that the period, sandwiched between the roaring 20s, the depression, and the reawakening of activism in the late 60s and 70s, does not represent the benchmark for American culture, but an era unique in its own way.Elaine Tyler May is the Regents Professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at the University of Minnesota.

She is the author books including America and the Pill, Homeward Bound, and Barren in the Promised Land, which received Honorable Mention for the William J. Goode Book cheri197.com former president of the American Studies Association and the Organization of American /5(2).

Elaine Tyler May's text "Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era", remains a classic in American Studies-and example of relevant, clear, well-written scholarship utilizing a variety of data to make a interesting and important case.5/5. Elaine Tyler May opened her book, Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era, with a description of a publicity stunt.

A young couple, recently married, chooses to spend their honeymoon in a bomb shelter/5(55). Elaine Tyler May is the Regents Professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at the University of Minnesota. She is the author books including America and the Pill, Homeward Bound, and Barren in the Promised Land, which received Honorable Mention for the William J.

Questions?

Goode Book Award. Elaine Tyler May is the Regents Professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at the University of Minnesota.

She is the author books including America and the Pill, Homeward Bound, and Barren in the Promised Land, which received Honorable Mention for the William J.

Questions?

Goode Book cheri197.com former president of the American Studies Association and the Organization of American Reviews: Elaine Tyler May opened her book, Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era, with a description of a publicity stunt.

A young couple, recently married, chooses to spend their honeymoon in a bomb shelter.4/4(40).

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A review of the book homeward bound by elaine tyler may
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